Phone Us

UK: 0330 22 30 922

(Mobile Friendly)


INT: +44 1337 860 860

(0)Shopping Cart

You have no items in your shopping cart.

Monthly Archives: May 2016

  • Did you miss the Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design Degree Show 2016?

    Some highlights of the DJCAD Art, Architecture and Design Degree Show this year _RichtoneHDR

    When Degree Show time of year rolls around, a peculiar mix of emotions seem to linger within the walls of University art buildings. The sense of release is almost palpable; an enormous bubble of built-up tension and stress over the last few months having finally burst, leaving the products of true inspiration, hard graft, creative problem-solving and sheer drudgery spread throughout the exhibition. The pieces which really stood out tended to show an ability to skilfully address the universal through the specific, an innate, sensitive and personal relationship with their chosen material, and a skilled, crafted aspect to the resolution of their work. The following works are ones that continue to resonate long after their initially compelling visual impact.

    Excellent drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, sculpture and installation works

    Summertonsmall Jasmine Summerton

    Some of the highlights in Fine Art were Jasmine Summerton’s multi-disciplined work, focusing on simply being in the Cairngorms National Park. "Enter, observe, notice, perceive, behold" is her self-styled motto for her project. A collection of prints, a hand-made compass and observatory, and artist’s books collectively indicate a deep, slow methodology. The observatory, made in silver, lightfast and reversible material stands quiet in the room, majestic and mute yet looking like a curious intergalactic vessel. Intimate photographic prints on aluminium afford us small, obscured glimpses into the mystery of the natural wilderness, whilst a series of nine lithographic prints feature the observatory in nine different places across the National Park. Meditative and thoughtful, Summerton’s work speaks of the magnificent and sublime aspects of a dramatic, evolving landscape to which we are humbled to bear witness: the stark isolation of the observatory amidst dramatic scenery highlights our alien-ness, our desire to belong but also not belonging, and also the ambivalence of the human presence in the landscape.

    Donaldson Gavin Donaldson

    In the gallery space below, Gavin Donaldson’s four large canvases command considerable attention and contemplation, bringing painting back into the spotlight once again. The artist’s bold compositional decisions and muted palette is reminiscent of Nathan Ford’s portraits; they measure over 1.75m wide by 2m high. Two particularly successful close-up paintings manage to strike a perfect tension between two and three dimensions, whilst keeping within the integrity of their canvases' four corners. Donaldson has loosened, pulled and puckered his canvas, manipulating these folds so as to integrate with the contours and planes of the pictured face. As one moves in front of the paintings, a crease across the cheek bone, a protruding lip, a receding eye all virtually fragment and distort these intense portraits. Donaldson's clear technical ability, combined with a loose handling of paint and subtly refined use of mixed media all point to a clear finesse with his materials. The crumpled quality of the paintings evokes encountering a lost, creased image on a street; their stillness resonates as the images slowly take shape before you.

    Bititci Melissa Bititchi

    Another highly notable mention are the sculptures by Melissa Bititci. The artist’s concentric splices of wood, suspended from the ceiling and splattered in a frenzy of colours made from melted children’s crayons are a sensual delight to behold. The shapesvoke East Asian temple adornments and the sparsity of their curation, with each being presented in a totally different way, works well. Also in the same room, don't miss Alexander Allan’s comprehensive, performative and political works and Laura Brown’s photography; both are of interest and show great potential.

    Innovative and expertly crafted textiles, jewellery and more

    AbbieNeave_work_web Abbie Neave

    Both Textile and Metal and Jewellery Design departments boast incredible collections of highly sophisticated, exotic and innovative works. Morag Taylor weaves beautiful tones of orange and blue into her fabrics, creating garments and a textile-based sculpture, and Abbie Neave’s brightly-coloured, jazzy textiles are a visual treat. On the floor below, Hayley Brook pushes the potential of aluminium, silicone and laser-cutting to another level through her explorations of the Scottish landscape; whilst April Black crafts exquisite wooden, hand-carved bowls incorporating tiny specks of silver and copper.

    Overall, the whole exhibition shows a general curatorial strength that includes well-devised thematic links between works, for example transitions between pieces linking the city, nature and the body as a performative arena. Sadly, there are far too many works to be able to comment upon here, including fantastic work in the Animation, Graphic Design and Architecture departments. What is most important is the time and attitude you bring in getting to know and understand the purposes, ideas, materials and complexities of the works in front of you when you enter DJCAD. The works on display have been well thought-out and passionately handled, and it is a privilege to able to engage with them.

    The DJCAD Degree Show is on from the 20th May till the 29th May, at the University of Dundee on Perth Road.

     

  • The Mesmerizing Installations of Katharina Grosse

    Grosse

    Where art seeps into life

    Katharina Grosse is a German artist and writer, born in Freiburg in 1961 and lives and works in Berlin. The artist uses acrylic spray paint fired through industrial spray guns to create immersive, colour experiences. Creating her works on an enormous scale, the works make the viewer aware of their own size in comparison. Grosses’s rainbow-like installations appear to be simultaneously concerned with the nature of observation and the fact of simply being in the space. The artist paints across whole stretches of chosen sites or gallery walls, swallowing up architectural details, or objects that she incorporates into the painting. We realise that the boundaries between where the ‘painting’ begins and where the gallery space or building ends begins to blur, encouraging us to view the whole space as an artistic experience. Grosse 2

    Joyful, bold colour

    As she paints, layers of paint build upon one another, creating a patchwork of colours that connect and respond with each other. Textures of rock, sand, bookshelves and even beds appear otherworldly after she has passed her paint over them, and contrast with dripping or cloudy spray gun marks that cover the flat walls. Due to the use of spray paint, her works have a graffiti-like style that evokes a certain tag or signature quality to the works. Through this manner of working, we also feel that these paintings are done quickly and decisively, almost like a performance yet with no audience bearing witness to it. Katharina Grosse’s work strikes me as truly joyful. She incorporates a whole range of materials into her work, and challenges us to rethink the nature of a painting, and how we might frame such a concept. Her brilliant, saturated hues spreading across enormous spaces appear to me as a celebration of colour, illustrating that the medium of paint seems more alive than ever today.

2 Item(s)

BackTop
Post your comment

iartsupplies.co.uk ~ trinity arts