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  • Montana Chalk Spray Paint

    Montana Chalk Paints are an eco-friendly and inexpensive tool for spraying a little colour on your life.

    Montana chalk spray paints are eco-friendly paints that have many uses for art and craft projects. It's mostly recommended for indoor work or outdoor temporary marking.

    They work on various surfaces such as pavements, walls, cardboard, canvas or wood. On non-porous surfaces like glass or metal they are only temporary so you might need to apply varnish after it dries to make it permanent.

    Montana Chalk sprays comes in ten different colours that are all matte, have a high coverage, and 'produce a rough chalk effect'.

    Depending on weather conditions and climate the Montana Chalk sprays can last between several weeks to several months, therefore they are not suitable for permanent application outdoors. The Chalk spray will become permanent if it’s sealed with varnish.

    For an in-depth test, see http://www.amazingstreetpainting.com/street-painting-blog/chalk-test-2015

    The Montana Chalk Spray paint is ideal for DIY projects as well. Perfect for creating that distressed look!

    Mason jar vase
    Distressed vintage furniture
    Picture/ mirror frames

    For more guides to creating a distressed furniture look, see

    and

  • Bookbinding Techniques 2. - Concertina

    Concertina, or Accordion Fold Book

    Folding-out booklets are not only good for interesting ways to sketch, but perfect for display purposes as well. And it's not too difficult to make on your own!

    What You'll Need:

    Tools:

    • Bonefolder
    • Ruler
    • Brush
    • Scissors or craft knife

    Materials:

    • 2 Bookboards
    • Bookcloth
    • 2 sheets of paper
    • PVA glue

     

    Method:

    cut two long rectangles that are the same size.

    Fold them in half,

    ... then fold them like an accordion.

    until you have a "W" shape.

    If you want more sheets, you can make as many accordion fold as you want to, and you can just attach them together with glue.

    To make the covers, get two sheets of heavier paper/cardboard/bookboards that are slightly bigger than your folded booklet. If you want to cover it with bookcloth of paper, cut rectangles that are a few cms/inches bigger than the cover.

    Cut the edges of the paper/cloth...

    ... then glue them and fold them inside.

    This is how it should look outside and inside:

    Glue the inside of the cover and attach the first sheet of your accordion booklet.

    And it's finished!

    You can try making the book with watercolour or any other paper for sketching, or you can make a photo album, or something crazy that fits into an artist book.

    References and Photos:

  • How to Make Your Own Paint

    Oil Paint Colour

    Now, after the  INTRODUCTION TO OIL PAINTthe next challenge is to try making your own!

    Oil paints are basically the mixture of pigments and oil. Their popularity is caused by their qualities to dry without changing shape and colour, as well as their archival properties, meaning that the oxidised oil binds the pigments, making it possible to keep the painting intact for hundreds of years.

    Making your own oil paint allows you to experiment with the consistency of the paint, as well as the colours. Pigments found in nature can even be used to create your own unique colours.

    What do I need to make your own Oil Paint:

    • mortar and pestle
    • muller and glass slab
    • palette knife
    • linseed oil ( cold-pressed, raw or unrefined)
    • refined beeswax
    • pigment(s)
    • paint tubes (optional)

    The Method

    First of all, you will make a small pile of pigment on the glass slab, and make a small gap in the middle. Pour a bit of oil there and start mixing with a palette knife or spatula. Don’t worry if it’s not easy to mix, and only add a small amount of oil at a time, as you want the mixture to have the smallest amount of oil as possible.

    Start grinding the mixture with the muller in a circular motion, spreading the mixture gradually on the slab. The idea is to try covering every pigment particle with the least possible amount of oil. From time to time, scrape the paint off of the muller and start grinding again, spreading the paint. Do this until the mixture reaches a ‘paint consistency’, as it varies from pigment to pigment.

    Fillers and Binders used in Oil Paint

    Fillers tend to be seen as not good, but they have certain advantages. (the only thing you don’t want is more filler than pigment in the paint!)

    Barium sulphate and aluminium hydroxide are two common extenders, which are used to increase the volume of the paint without altering the colour. (it’s advised not to add more than 25%, as it may effect the colour)

    Beeswax acts as an emulsifier that helps strengthen the bond between pigment and oil, as well as a thixotropic agent that keeps the pigments evenly distributed.

    Storing Oil Paint

    You can choose from storing the freshly made paint in a glass jar, or in pre-made paint tubes. The latter will have an open base with a plastic cap on the other end. You can put the paint in with a palette knife and when it’s filled, squeeze the paint in the cap side of the tube in order to get rid of air bubbles. Don’t overfill the tube, as you need to leave a bit so as to roll up the excess. You might want to use pliers to fold it over. When it’s done, label the tube with the media, pigment and date of manufacture.

    Videos

    References

    • http://www.earthpigments.com/artists-oil-paints/
    • http://www.sinopia.com/How-to-make-Oil-Paint
    • http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Make-Oil-Paint/
    • http://www.artpromotivate.com/2012/07/how-to-make-your-own-oil-paint-home.html
    • http://www.paintmaking.com/grinding_oils.htm
    • http://www.webexhibits.org/pigments/intro/oil.html
    • http://www.kamapigment.com/en/demonstrations/demo1_01.html
    • http://www.kamapigment.com/en/information/how-to-make-your-paints.html

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